MyNorth.com http://mynorth.com Everything good about Life in Traverse City and Northern Michigan Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:06:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 The MyNorthTickets Minute: Food, Fiddles, and More http://mynorth.com/2014/08/mynorthtickets-minute/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/mynorthtickets-minute/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:20:45 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58893 Northern Michigan events highlights are brought to you by MyNorth Media correspondent Jenny Buechel. You can catch the MyNorthTickets Minute each Wednesday at 5:45 pm on Fox 32 and Channel […]

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Northern Michigan events highlights are brought to you by MyNorth Media correspondent Jenny Buechel. You can catch the MyNorthTickets Minute each Wednesday at 5:45 pm on Fox 32 and Channel 9&10 News.

Couldn’t catch this week’s edition? Just check out Jenny’s script below, and click to watch the video!


“This weekend we’re all about the food and music of Northern Michigan, so let’s talk about K. Jones and the Benzie Playboys. Their Louisiana dance sound uses traditional button accordions, fiddles, and washboard which you can hear live at the Old Art Building in Leland.

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As for the food, there’s a little something called Taste of Traverse City happening this Friday through Sunday. It includes five different events, many of them happening here at the Grand Traverse Resort—so here’s the rundown:

1. The Downtown Grub Crawl: You’ll sip, sample and shop your way down Front Street and more.

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2. The Taste of Traverse City: This is an all-day epicurean tasting event complete with live music.

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3. Dining in the Dark: It’s exactly what you think it is! Eating in the dark intensifies your senses beyond sight. That’s at the top of the resort at the Aerie Restaurant and Lounge.

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4. White House Dinner: Inspired by favorite dishes of past presidents. Former chef to the White House, Chef Walter Scheib entertains with inside stories.

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5. Best of the Brunch: Vote your favorite brunch station including chef, supplier or farm and beverage company or coffee shop. Plus get your hair of the dog at The Bloody Mary Throwdown.

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That’s the lineup, pick and choose where you’ll go this weekend at MyNorthTickets.com.”


More Northern Michigan Events

 

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2014 Michigan Travel for Labor Day: Road Construction Suspended http://mynorth.com/2014/08/2014-northern-michigan-labor-day-weekend-road-construction-suspended/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/2014-northern-michigan-labor-day-weekend-road-construction-suspended/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 15:06:44 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58952 Getting Up North to your Northern Michigan vacation during Labor Day weekend just became much easier: to ease Michigan travel for Labor Day, the Michigan Department of […]

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Getting Up North to your Northern Michigan vacation during Labor Day weekend just became much easier: to ease Michigan travel for Labor Day, the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) is once again halting a majority of its road projects for the Labor Day holiday weekend. AAA Michigan estimates 1.12 million motorists will be using Michigan roads and bridges during the last weekend before school starts.

Beginning at 3 pm on Friday, August 29th, and continuing until 6 am on Tuesday, September 2nd, 126 out of 156 projects statewide will have lane restrictions lifted. While some construction zones will be halted for the weekend, equipment and lane shifts will stay in place for remaining projects, requiring drivers to adjust their speed and pay attention.

“While many drivers will be enjoying this last holiday weekend, it’s important to remember that safety on the roads requires year-round attention,” said State Transportation Director Kirk T. Steudle. “Always buckle up, follow the posted speed limit, and don’t use your phone or text while driving. Let’s all work to ensure everyone has a great Labor Day weekend and makes it home safely.”

For up-to-date information on MDOT projects, view the list of statewide lane closures at Michigan.gov.

The following is a list of work zones that will remain active during the Labor Day weekend:

Upper Peninsula

  • I-75 near Rudyard, Chippewa County, will have a posted detour in effect for two projects between M-134 and M-48.
  • M-26, Houghton County, will have two lanes open between the Portage Lake Lift Bridge and Dollar Bay with a temporary roadway.
  • M-149 near Manistique, Schoolcraft County, will have a posted detour in effect at Dufour Creek.
  • US-2 in Ironwood, Gogebic County, will have eastbound traffic detoured via local roads in Hurley, Wis., and Ironwood.
  • US-2 near Manistique, Schoolcraft County, will have one lane open in each direction from east of the Delta/Schoolcraft county line to M-149. Wide loads restricted.

For more information, contact Dan Weingarten, Superior Region Communications Representative, at 906.250.4809.

North Lower Peninsula

  • US-23, Iosco County, will have a traffic shift south of Oscoda. Wide loads restricted.
  • Old US-131, Wexford County, will be closed to through-traffic from Boon Road to US-131 near Cadillac. Detour on US-131.

For more information, contact James Lake, North Region Communications Representative, at 906.250.0993.


More Northern Michigan Labor Day

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Run to Prevent Domestic Violence in Northern Michigan http://mynorth.com/2014/08/run-to-prevent-domestic-violence-in-northern-michigan/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/run-to-prevent-domestic-violence-in-northern-michigan/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:25:11 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58922 On Saturday, October 11, run to prevent domestic violence in Northern Michigan—and enjoy fall colors at the tree-filled grounds of the Village at Grand Traverse Commons in […]

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On Saturday, October 11, run to prevent domestic violence in Northern Michigan—and enjoy fall colors at the tree-filled grounds of the Village at Grand Traverse Commons in Traverse City. The Hands Are Not For Hurting Run begins and ends at the Womens Resource Center grounds located at 720 S. Elmwood, next to the Grand Traverse Pavillions and just across Village at Grand Traverse Commons with its boutiques and eateries.

Runners will enjoy a course that winds through the beautiful Historic Barns on the village property and the surrounding parkland.

The Hands Are Not For Hurting run is a community-wide event sponsored by the Women’s Resource Center in Traverse City. The run focuses on bringing a greater awareness of domestic violence to the Northern Michigan area. The Women’s Resource Center is the current driving force for emotional and financial support for domestic violence victims and the process from the event will go toward expanding already existing programs.

Date: Saturday, October 11, 2014

Time: 8am (registration) | 9am (race)

Early Registration Fee: $25 (registration closes the day before the event)

Day of Registration: $30

Location: WRC Location: 720 S. Elmwood, Traverse City, Mi

Registration includes a custom long sleeve shirt, snacks, refreshments and live entertainment.

Register online 

Register by Phone: 231.941.1210

Register In Person: WRC Office: 720 S. Elmwood, Traverse City, Mi

Register day of 8am: 720 S. Elmwood, Traverse City, M

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Man from Traverse City Runs 100-Mile Race http://mynorth.com/2014/08/man-from-traverse-city-runs-100-mile-race/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/man-from-traverse-city-runs-100-mile-race/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:03:20 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58862 In mid-August of 2014, Traverse City’s Dan Kaupas ran 100 miles. For fun. Kaupas competed in an unfathomable sport event called the Leadville Trail 100 Run, finishing in […]

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In mid-August of 2014, Traverse City’s Dan Kaupas ran 100 miles. For fun. Kaupas competed in an unfathomable sport event called the Leadville Trail 100 Run, finishing in a little less than 29 hours despite daunting factors like unpredictable weather and elevation ranging from 9,200 feet to 12,600 feet.

This hundred-mile “Race Across the Sky” started in 1983 in Leadville, Colorado. It was created to provide an economic boost to the old mining town, and 32 years later there are a series of mega-races, including the Trail 100 Run. This year there were 700 participants in the race, including Kaupas.

MyNorth’s Eliza Foster chatted with Dan Kaupas to find out more about his unusual training techniques and what possessed him to run a hundred miles.


Why did you want to run this race of all races?

I was in a severe car accident when I was 12 years old. I broke my skull—among other things—and I was in a coma for seven days. So that messed me up physically. Then in February of 2011 I got a DUI, and I said that I’ve got to do something else. I was sort of just drinking my pain away.

I needed something else to take my time besides drinking. I stopped drinking and the running and the bike riding were a natural turn. I was at Brick Wheels getting my bike and they jokingly challenged me to compete in the first year of Mud, Sweat, and Beers. I did pretty good at it and I’d never trained. I did some more bike races and I was pretty good at those, too.

Then my neighbor was talking to me and he was joking around and said, “Anybody can coast on a bike, you should try to run a marathon.  I mean you know how to run right?” So I did the Bayshore and then some other half marathons here and there. I never trained for any of them.

My dad’s joke became “What could you do if you trained?” Last summer my aunt and uncle were in town and they live about 30 minutes from Leadville. We were at dinner and my dad’s joke came up again, so my two cousins said that I should do Leadville. They told me it was happening soon and I said, “Okay I’ll do it.” And they said, “No, you can’t just run a hundred miles, you need to train.” So I didn’t run in it then, but on January 1st, I signed up and started training after that.

What was your training like? Did you do most of your training in Traverse City despite the lack of Rockies?

Commitment wise it takes a ton of your time. I did train in Traverse City, but I went out to Colorado ten days before the race so that I could adjust my lungs to the altitude. When I trained here I used an oxygen deprivation mask. I didn’t do much hill training to be honest. In the Bayshore this year I tore my calf muscle, so I didn’t do any training between the Bayshore and Leadville. Instead of running I trained with an athletic trainer, and I did a lot of cycling and a lot of gym time.

So when you were competing, what was your mental process like throughout? How did it feel to run for 29 hours straight?

It goes by really quick, it’s weird. You are constantly changing terrain, so you might be in a field you have to run through and then the next moment you are running four miles up a mountain into the woods. After that you are above the tree line running for 30 to 35 miles.

There are a lot of high and low moments, but then I would think, I am out for a jog in the Rocky Mountains, and you look around and you say, “Wow, that is beautiful.” At least it gets your mind off of your legs a minute.

Did you have a pacer throughout the race?

Yes. The second fifty miles is when I got pacers.

A crew precedes you and they are at each of the 11 aid stations. So I saw them about every 2.5 hours. At an aid station they would fill the water pack on my back with more water and fill my sport drink. I would spend about 8-9 minutes at aid stations changing my shoes, socks or shirts as it got colder [temperatures ranged from the low 30s to low 70s].

They would also feed me. I was supposed to consume 12,000 calories throughout the race. They had lunch meat turkey, PB&Js, bananas, jerky, summer sausage, peanut M&M’s, Ensure, and honey sticks.

The pacers mule your backpack with food, clothing, and water in it for you. They run about 10 miles with you. They would just hand me a piece of banana, tear off some sandwich or whatever to keep me going. I only got one pacer at a time, but not every runner has a pacer, some people run one pacer all the way back.

How did you feel when you crossed the finish line?

Emotionally spent. You’ve given everything. Mentally, physically, and emotionally every ounce was spent. I think one eye had a tear of pain and the other had a tear of joy.

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Dan holds his medal after completing the race.

How was your recovery? Did it take a few days to bounce back?

I’m still recovering. On mile 60, I severely sprained my ankle. I hit a tire mark that I couldn’t see by the river. I rolled my ankle and popped my knee out but I didn’t get any help for it, I just kept going. I just thought that if I could walk away from the race I could walk further down the trail.

Are you planning on taking on Leadville again? Any other upcoming races?

I want to do Leadville again in a couple years now knowing what I am in for, and to be able to go into it without injuries and shoot for a below 25 hour finish.

I also have a race in the beginning of May around Long Lake here in Traverse City: The Long Lake Challenge 13.1. It’s a great precursor to the Bayshore marathon for runners of that, and also I see it as a great way for people to stay motivated towards something over the winter. I found myself as the winter went on needing something to look forward to in the spring, to keep lacing up my shoes and running or to keep going to the gym.


 

More Northern Michigan Running

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Northern Michigan Beers for Autumn http://mynorth.com/2014/08/5-northern-michigan-beers-for-autumn/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/5-northern-michigan-beers-for-autumn/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:02:03 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58889 The season is slowly changing, and it’s time to swap out those brews that kept you cool in summer for Northern Michigan beers fermented for fall. Paired […]

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The season is slowly changing, and it’s time to swap out those brews that kept you cool in summer for Northern Michigan beers fermented for fall. Paired with football and autumn’s kaleidoscopic colors, these beers are a cast of can’t-misses from breweries in Bellaire, Ludington, Traverse City, and Petoskey.


Autumn-AleShort’s Brewing Co. — Autumn Ale →

It’s all in the name. Toasty malts and fruity hop notes make this ESB (code for “Extra Special Bitter”) a well-balanced, amber-colored, flavorful nectar. A silver medalist at the 2006 Great American Beer Festival, so you know it’s all kinds of delicious.

Find Short’s Autumn Ale on store shelves and at their Bellaire brewpub in September and October.

Beards Brewery — Oatmeal Raisin Cookie

Beards’ Oatmeal Raisin Cookie is beer’s answer to the bouquet of baked goods and homely flavors that proliferate through kitchens during the fall. Brewer Ben Slocum admits Oatmeal Raisin Cookie isn’t easy to pigeonhole, calling the recipe “an experimental American amber.” Raisins, cinnamon, oatmeal and brown sugar all contribute to the medley.

Find Beards’ Oatmeal Raisin Cookie at Beards’ Petoskey brewpub and in Northern Michigan tap rooms in late October.

Rare Bird Brew Pub — Schadenfreude Stout

This Traverse City microbrewery’s take on milk stout is painfully tasty. While it was a favorite featured during the pub’s opening in the summer of 2014, Schadenfreude took a break from the limelight as Rare Bird’s summertime brews shined. As the temperatures drop, darker beers like Schadenfreude will be on heavy rotation at Rare Bird. Says brewer Tina Schuett: “It’s a light-bodied stout. We use de-bittered malts that don’t leave an acrid taste and let the chocolate and toffee flavors come through.”

Look for Schadenfreude Stout at Rare Bird’s Traverse City pub in September and October.

Jamesport Brewing Co. — Dunkelweizen

Jamesport’s Dunkelweizen is a traditional interpretation of the classically German, quintessentially autumnal beer style. A relative of hefeweizen, dunkelweizens feature the same banana bread-clove combo that screams summer, but additional dark malts give dunkels a little more meat—perfect for a fall’s day in lakeside Ludington.

Find Jamesport’s Dunkelweizen at their Ludington brew pub in mid-September and October.


More Northern Michigan Beer

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Women on Water: Rowing a Northern Michigan Boat http://mynorth.com/2014/08/women-on-water-rowing-a-northern-michigan-boat/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/women-on-water-rowing-a-northern-michigan-boat/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 13:01:36 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58872 For the July 2014 issue of Traverse, Northern Michigan’s Magazine, we challenged five female Michigan writers with the task of reflecting on Northern Michigan’s lakes, streams, beaches and […]

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For the July 2014 issue of Traverse, Northern Michigan’s Magazine, we challenged five female Michigan writers with the task of reflecting on Northern Michigan’s lakes, streams, beaches and boats—in a word: water. The third essay in the series was written by Traverse City-based writer and Fleda Brown.

Read the first two essays in the Women on Water series:


My aunt Cleone, who often made the lake rules, felt it was necessary to wait not one, but two hours after eating before swimming. Someone she knew apparently had drowned between hour one and hour two. So we were doomed. But at least my cousin Alan and I could head out in the rowboat as soon as breakfast was over, putting in our two hours on the water legally. (We children were allowed to take the boats out alone after we’d demonstrated that we could swim the half-mile across the lake and back.)

The rowboat was a gorgeous thing, double-oared, fast as lightning with all four oars in motion. It was a Mullins brand, almost exactly like a Whitehall. We called it The Whaler. It was 13 feet long, galvanized steel, dented and scuffed even then. It had a few light wood ribs, a wood keel inside the hull, and weathered gray wood trim, gunwales and seats. What made it so good was its wine-glass stern, so there was no drag to speak of from the back.

When my cousins Alan and Roger were young, they could with great effort and with both rowing, hold their own against a five-horse motor of the time. When Alan and I weren’t trying for speed, the glide was effortless and the wake nearly nonexistent. It was easy to manage in a wind, because its weight and deep keel prevented sideways skidding. All the power went into forward movement. We scorned the flat-bottom aluminum rowboat and made the little kids use it.

Sometimes we took peanut butter and honey sandwiches. This was before all the property along the shore had cottages planted on it. We could pull up through the reeds on a deserted beach and eat our sandwiches, bothered only by a dozen little bees.

Robinson Crusoe, The Boxcar Children, Huckleberry Finn, Heidi: the stories that held me had to do with getting away from civilization and making your own new one from the bottom up. The wooden ribs of the rowboat could hold the few items you’d need. You didn’t even have to have a lifejacket back then. And the trip, which had no specific goal, was self-propelled. My cousin Alan is exactly my age, but he’s a lot bigger and stronger. I pulled as long and hard as I could—I would not allow myself a handicap for my girl-ness.

The joy of water is its resistance that never becomes intractability. In a strong wind, your muscles burn from trying to make a little headway measured by the trees on shore. On a glassy lake, water shows you where you’ve been in ever-widening rings. You carve it. You bless or cuss your oars. If they’re the old heavy wood ones, your palms begin to redden and sting, the oarlocks rattle and thunk. If they’re the newer plastic ones, your arms seem to fly upward out of the water, the oarlocks manage only a tinny click. If you’ve greased them too much, the oar pins can fly out.

Since you row facing backward, you see the past. You have to look over your shoulder to see the future, but you can’t keep your head turned that way for long, because you’ll get a crick in your neck, so you just glance, to keep yourself going in the direction you intend, and to keep from hitting anything. This requires a different sort of awareness, based partly on trust and partly on seeing what you’ve already done, for good or ill.

If you’re attentive, you can give up the oars for a minute, lean over the bow and grab a turtle off a log. At least my cousin Alan could. He had fast hands. You hold it by its shell and learn a lot from looking into its prehistoric eyes.

What else I learned: (1) be still if you want to see anything interesting; (2) the world is vast and great fun if you’re willing to use your muscles; (3) the tactile is infinitely rewarding, even more so than the imagination; (4) you can’t fix the past, but you can watch it peacefully from the rear; (5) watch out for the overhanging branch.


More Northern Michigan Beaches & Boating

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Late Summer Glow in Leelanau County http://mynorth.com/2014/08/late-summer-glow-in-leelanau-county/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/late-summer-glow-in-leelanau-county/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 11:10:58 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58930 The post Late Summer Glow in Leelanau County appeared first on MyNorth.com.

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Q&A with Adam Satchwell from Northern Michigan Winery, Shady Lane Cellars http://mynorth.com/2014/08/qa-with-adam-satchwell-from-shady-lane-cellars/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/qa-with-adam-satchwell-from-shady-lane-cellars/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:08:28 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58811 Located in Suttons Bay on the Leelanau Peninsula, Shady Lane Cellars was one of the early producers of Northern Michigan wine. With award-winning wines and a new outdoor […]

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Located in Suttons Bay on the Leelanau Peninsula, Shady Lane Cellars was one of the early producers of Northern Michigan wine. With award-winning wines and a new outdoor tasting patio set amid the spectacular beauty of Leelanau County, the winery is thoroughly flourishing.

MyNorth’s Sig Steiger talked to Shady Lane Cellars general manager and winemaker Adam Satchwell to pick his brain about the new outdoor tasting room, as well as learn about Shady Lanes’ latest awards and upcoming events.


When did the idea come about for an outdoor tasting area?

I’ve been thinking about some kind of expansion to our tasting room for many years. I knew how I wanted the new space to add to the overall tasting and interactive experience for our guests, and then once I assembled a design/build team the current design evolved.

What does it consist of?

We created a new, expansive patio that incorporates lots of new seating areas highlighted with stacked stone walls, a fireplace and quite a bit of new and colorful landscaping. We designed this space to work beautifully as an event space for our own Shady Lane Cellars events, such as our new summer Music On The Patio series as well as weddings, corporate and private functions. The center piece of all of this is the outdoor tasting pavilion/bar, it is a design masterpiece created by the architect George Moutsatson. It’s an open air, covered, 32-foot-long curved bar finished in Douglas Fir, Brazilian Granite and some absolutely incredible design features and details.

What does the new patio accommodate that the tasting room doesn’t?

We all love our tasting room. It is a gorgeous fieldstone building dating back to 1906 and is finished in many of the same elements as our new outdoor space. The reality is that the tasting room is quite small and did not always comfortably accommodate the number of visitors we see at our winery. That, plus making Shady Lane Cellars available as an event venue for our guests was not practical with the original tasting room. Now we have considerably expanded space for our guests whether it is for tasting our wines, coming out to enjoy some music, or hosting their own event.

What was the vision for the patio tying into the Shady Lane experience for visitors?

We have always felt Shady Lane Cellars is an absolute gem among the many fine wineries in the region. We wanted to create something that enhanced the whole guest experience, create a wonderful event venue and bring people outdoors to share in the beauty of our vineyards and the Leelanau landscape.

What’s something you’re excited about that’s going on or upcoming at Shady Lane?

Obviously we’re excited about our new patio and outdoor tasting pavilion, and what that means for our guests. We have already had some great music performances here and have more scheduled yet this summer and fall; we’ll be expanding the Music Series next season. We’re excited to be able to offer a one-of-a-kind event venue for our guests to share for weddings and all sorts of events. We have a new tasting room manager, Mr. Rick DeBlasio, who we were able to coax away from The Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina—which happens to be the most visited tasting room in all of the United States. Rick brings a wealth of experience to Shady Lane Cellars, and our guests will be sure to expect a better-than-ever experience when they visit our winery.

We’ve expanded the offerings in our gift shop and have some very cool items available. We’re launching a new online shopping feature on our website so people can order our wines and have them shipped directly to their home, as well as a new Wine Club that offers some great savings and exclusive offerings. And of course there are the wines. We have received many top awards for our wines recently including Best of Class Awards (the highest award possible) in international wine competitions for our Gewurztraminer as well as our red wine, Blue Franc, and our premium red blend, Franc ‘n’ Franc. We have also been awarded Double Gold and Gold Medals for our Dry Riesling and Semi-Dry Riesling. We’ve begun to release some of our red wines from the great 2012 vintage, and we are very excited about these bottlings. In a nutshell, I guess we are excited about just about everything these days at Shady Lane Cellars.


More Northern Michigan Wine

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Old Mission Peninsula Real Estate: Farmhouse and Acreage near the Lighthouse http://mynorth.com/2014/08/old-mission-peninsula-real-estate-farmhouse-and-acreage-near-the-lighthouse/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/old-mission-peninsula-real-estate-farmhouse-and-acreage-near-the-lighthouse/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:04:48 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=58842 With nearly 80 acres of fertile farmland, 100 feet of sandy frontage on West Grand Traverse Bay and an historic farmhouse, this piece of Northern Michigan real […]

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With nearly 80 acres of fertile farmland, 100 feet of sandy frontage on West Grand Traverse Bay and an historic farmhouse, this piece of Northern Michigan real estate is an Eden for potential Northern Michigan land owners. Located 25 minutes north of Traverse City, this Old Mission Peninsula real estate listing can accommodate the development of a vineyard or large stable, or can be maintained in its current state as a functional cherry orchard.

Several outbuildings surround the idyllic Northern Michigan home, the taxes of which are low given its status as a farmstead. The home contains 3 bedrooms and 1.5 baths, though a recently installed septic system can facilitate a large expansion to the home.

Click the arrows in the upper-right corner of the gallery to enlarge images; hit “Escape” on keyboard to exit full-screen:

A view from the property's 100 feet of West Bay frontage Some of the property's 80 acres Interior: kitchen Interior: dining room

View This Listing At MyNorth’s Real Estate Showcase

Located in Traverse City, this property is listed by Lou Ann Ford of Century 21 Northland. Call Lou Anne at 231.645.3643 or visit C21Northland.com.


More Northern Michigan Real Estate

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Northern Michigan Fishery Updates http://mynorth.com/2014/08/spring-fishing-safety-tips-and-updates/ http://mynorth.com/2014/08/spring-fishing-safety-tips-and-updates/#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:00:38 +0000 http://mynorth.com/?p=47590 The Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ Northern Michigan fishery update compiles successes and shortcomings from across the Northern Michigan fishing map. Find fast facts about nearby fisheries […]

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The Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ Northern Michigan fishery update compiles successes and shortcomings from across the Northern Michigan fishing map. Find fast facts about nearby fisheries below, and get out into Northern Michigan’s outdoors this autumn!


Fisheries in Northern Lower Michigan

  • Harbor Springs: Harbor Point is still producing lots of lake trout anywhere from 50 to 100 feet down in 120 to 160 feet. One boat caught a salmon up near Seven Mile Point when using spoons or dodgers with flies.
  • Petoskey: Surface water temperatures were at 60 degrees and the thermocline was 50 to 60 feet down. Salmon fishing seems to be picking up but some boats are only getting lake trout. Most are fishing near the hospital and water treatment plant but a few were in Bay Harbor and straight out from the marina. Lake trout were scattered everywhere but 70 to 90 feet down produced quite a few. Although most of the chinook were 50 feet down one was caught at 90 feet and a coho was caught 40 feet down. Try spoons, plugs and meat rigs. Pier anglers are still catching smallmouth bass but many were small. Try crawlers, small tube baits, spinners and crank baits.
  • Bear River: Heavy rain and wind seemed like the perfect combination to push fish up into the river however only one steelhead was harvested at the dam. Salmon should start to show up soon.
  • Charlevoix: Boat anglers caught a few lake trout and the odd salmon. Most are trolling near the cement plant and towards Fisherman’s Island. Fish were caught 40 to 60 feet down in 100 feet with spoons and flies. A few lake trout were taken 60 to 80 feet down off North Point but a few were hitting shallow just 20 to 25 feet down. Smallmouth fishing in the channel is good but only a couple keepers were taken with crawlers and leeches on the bottom. Freshwater drum were also caught.
  • Traverse City: In the East Bay, anglers were hooking into a few salmon but overall catch rates were slow. Depths were highly variable with fish caught anywhere from 40 to 115 feet. Catch rates for lake trout were fair. Smallmouth bass were found in 30 to 50 feet. In the West Bay, salmon fishing is slowly picking up. Lake trout action was steady in 90 to 120 feet.
  • Elk River: Still has slow catch rates with only smallmouth, rock bass and freshwater drum for the taking.
  • Boardman River: Had slow fishing as well. Early arrival chinook salmon should start to show up soon. Anglers caught smallmouth, rock bass and freshwater drum.
  • Platte River: Catch rates were slow with only a couple small rainbow trout taken on dry flies up near the hatchery.
  • Loon Lake: Anglers are finding pike and walleye along the west side.
  • Platte Bay: Those trolling caught some big lake trout and yellow was the hot color. Chinook were caught in the West Bay on J-plugs in green with a black ladder back.
  • Frankfort: Chinook, steelhead and lake trout were hitting in 100 to 150 feet. Anglers are trolling the top 80 feet with downriggers or 100 to 140 feet with dipseys and J-plugs. White and blue were hot colors. Salmon anglers are fishing the Herring Hole or heading a bit deeper to waters between 200 and 250 feet deep later in the day. Alewives are now in and around the piers. Shore anglers caught chinook on alewife or glow spoons in the early morning.
  • Onekama: Those heading straight out from the piers and trolling the top 60 feet in 120 to 170 feet have caught chinook and steelhead. The morning bite was best on meat rigs and flies. Red and blue were good colors.
  • Portage Lake: Bass anglers caught some very nice large and smallmouth when fishing around the docks and along the drop-offs.
  • Manistee: Catch rates were starting to improve with trout and salmon caught in the top 60 feet of waters 80 to 160 feet deep. Glow plugs and spoons worked well in low light conditions. Green flies and meat rigs also caught fish. A couple chinook were taken off the piers but catch rates were still slow.
  • Manistee River: A few salmon are pushing their way up as far as Tippy Dam in the Big Manistee. The Little Manistee saw a steady run of salmon. The Weir was put into place last week.
  • Ludington: Salmon and trout action was starting to improve. The better fishing was the top 60 feet of waters 90 to 180 feet deep when using green meat rigs and flies or glow plugs. Pier anglers caught a few chinook or brown trout on glow spoons.
  • Pere Marquette River: Also has some early salmon starting to show up. No big numbers yet but anglers are catching a few. Those fly fishing caught brown trout.
  • Pentwater: Those fishing in 80 to 100 feet seem to do best as the salmon appear to be staging for the run. Fish were caught a mile south of the pier and near the sand dunes at Silver Lake. Meat rigs were the ticket. Pier anglers caught smallmouth bass when still-fishing or casting with minnows.

 Charter A Boat In Northern Michigan:


Fisheries in the Upper Peninsula

  • Keweenaw Bay: The salmon bite was slow. Those jigging for lake trout found fish in 180 to 260 feet off Jentoff’s Dock, Whirl-l-Gig, out from the pine tree on the north side of Pequaming and along Big Reef. In Traverse Bay, the lake trout bite slowed in 100 to 150 feet along the mile reefs and 120 to 165 feet off Big Louie’s, Gay Point and Hermits Cove. Try 5 feet off the bottom with spoons. The bite was slow for the South Portage Entry for those trolling for lake trout.
  • Lake Antoine: Is producing some nice smallmouth bass for those using top water crank baits. Those drifting crawlers or using minnows and a jig with a piece of crawler have done well. Many were small but some were good size.
  • Marquette: Catch rates were slow and most anglers caught lake trout averaging 4 pounds. Stannard Rock was good with a number of young fish caught. Catch rates were fair near Little Presque Isle, Clay Banks and Granite Island. Anglers had limited success near Shot Point. No salmon yet however a few anglers were starting to spot the occasional chinook near the Carp River. Shore anglers using small spinners and spoons caught a few lake trout.
  • Little Bay De Noc: Walleye catch rates were spotty. At the head of the Bay anglers are trolling crawler harnesses in 6 to 14 feet and switching to stick baits at night. Fish were also caught in 16 to 24 feet along the Second Reef, the Black Bottom and in 12 to 20 feet off the mouth of the Escanaba River. Use crawlers on harnesses. Those fishing off Breezy Point were marking fish in 10 to 14 feet but few were caught. Smallmouth bass fishing was fair to good for those casting plastics, crank baits or spinners in 10 to 12 feet near the mouth of the Ford River. Perch anglers reported fair catches off the mouth of the Day’s River in 12 to 18 feet and the Second Reef in 10 to 20 feet. No salmon reports this week.
  • Big Bay De Noc: Had no walleye catches recorded. Perch action in Garden Bay slowed. Anglers were fishing throughout the center of the Bay in 9 to 14 feet with crawlers. Fair to good smallmouth bass fishing in 6 to 14 feet in Ogontz, 8 to 12 feet near Indian Point and 8 to 16 feet in Kate’s Bay. Most were using plastics or crank baits but some opted for crawlers. Salmon anglers had fair to good catches from the “Gap” and south past Poverty Island. Depths changed daily from 80 to 170 feet while 40 to 90 feet down. Overall this season has been slower than previous years.
  • Au Train: Fishing continues at a slow pace and there have been no salmon to report. Surface water temperatures near shore were close to 60 degrees and the offshore temperatures were in the upper 50′s. Catch rates for lake trout were spotty for those using spoons and cut bait in 120 to 180 feet northeast of Au Train Island near the flats and drop-offs. Try near the bottom along the edge of the reefs near Grump’s Hump, Millers and Wood Island.
  • Luce County: Those stream fishing for brook trout have done well.
  • Manistique Lake: Had good perch fishing.
  • St. Mary’s River: Had a few good fly hatches east of Lime Island, Macomb Island, and Maple Island. Those looking for lake herring and whitefish caught a few limits when jigging artificial flies with #12 hooks in 20 to 40 feet. Raber Bay was slow for legal size walleye with lots of 13 and 14 inch fish caught and released. Bigger walleye were caught along the east side of Neebish Island when using crawler harnesses near the drop-off in 12 to 18 feet. Keeper size walleye were caught off the steel breakwall just below the Sugar Island Ferry Dock. Evenings were best when drifting crawler harnesses. A good number of Atlantic salmon have been caught at the power plant off Portage Street when drifting natural flies on the discharge side. A few pike were taken along the west side near Burnt Island when trolling spoons with a red eye or bucktail spinners. Some reported catching perch at the south end of the Rock-Cut and north of Munuscong Bay at Moon Island when using shiners in 12 to 14 feet.
  • Detour: Was producing a good number of walleye off Swedes Pointe and Maude Bay but most of the fish were smaller.
  • Cedarville and Hessel: Pike fishing remains excellent for those still-fishing with chubs in Hessel Bay, Middle Entrance and along the north shore of Government Bay. Bass anglers casting in the shallows have done very well. Perch fishing was good in 8 feet in Hessel Bay but hit-or-miss in the Moscoe Channel.

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