Northern Michigan’s Northern Latitudes Distillery Offers High Spirits

Anyone following foodie-beverage trends, probably noticed that craft distilleries are popping up almost as rapidly as microbreweries a few years back. Instead of the wham-bam-thank-you-ma’am effect, these craft or micro-distilleries are taking a softer approach to their liquor making, developing flavors and subtleties that result in a more pleasurable liquor drinking experience. A food-wine-beer haven, it’s no surprise that Northern Michigan is jumping on the bandwagon, with new distilleries adding to the already sterling foodie reputation Up North.

Rachel North, marketing director for Traverse, Northern Michigan’s Magazine l MyNorth.com l MyNorth Media, shares her first visit experience at Northern Michigan’s newest distillery, Northern Latitudes. Check out this excerpt and read the rest of her blog, before heading to Northern Latitudes for a taste-test of your own.

“Northern Latitudes is flanked by Trish’s Dishes and the Fish Hook on Highway 204 (Duck Lake Road) just east of the bridge over the narrows of North and South Lake Leelanau. Know it by the glowing pergola where the still pokes up through the roof, it’s copper, silver and brass tubing glistening and sparkling.

Below, the Northern Latitudes tasting room bar is a sunny yellow pine. Tasters can enjoy a free taste of bourbon, vodka and soon, gin, served in a heavy, mini shot glass. Or, proprietors Mandy and Mark Moseler serve signature cocktails for purchase, using their spirits. And then you can buy a bottle or two or  a case to enjoy at home.

It’s a large tasting area with clubby chairs and a kids corner to keep them entertained while you and your friends languish in the language of liquor…”

Click here to read more about Rachels experience at Northern Latitudes Distillery!

Find more of Northern Michigan’s food and beverage offerings on MyNorth.com!

Article Comments

  • Anonymous

    Northern Michigan becoming foodie, wine-lovers destination – One ad is a 15-second spot promoting Traverse City, appearing each hour on an electronic billboard in New York’s Times Square.
    May 26, 2013 |
    Brys Estate Vineyard & Winery located on the Old Mission Peninsula in Traverse City on Wednesday May 15, 2013. / Ryan Garza/Detroit Free Press

    TRAVERSE CITY Northern Michigan— Now that Pure Michigan advertising has enticed more people to visit the state, it’s up to authentic Michigan experiences — rather than slick promotion or gimmicks — to keep them coming back.
    Otherwise, the notion of Michigan becoming a top-tier tourism draw is merely a vacation from reality.
    Evidence is emerging that the state is indeed building on unique geographic and historic assets, particularly in the Traverse City area, to grow the tourism economic pie. Up-and-coming wine and craft beer industries are meshing with America’s appetite for farm-to-table, locally grown food to turn the region into a “foodie” destination as well as a land of lakes, beauty and outdoor recreation.
    Here’s evidence that these attractions are getting notice outside the state:
    ■ Airlines are adding direct seasonal flights or more seats to Traverse City’s airport from Newark, Cleveland, New York LaGuardia, Denver and Atlanta. “That shows the kind of momentum we’re experiencing and the airlines are recognizing,” said Brad Van Dommelen, president of the Traverse City Convention & Visitors Bureau.
    ■ Traverse City hotels reported a 24% increase in out-of-state visitors last year. Six years ago, only 13.5% of visitors to the region were from outside Michigan; now it’s more than 25%.
    ■ Accolades are coming from afar: Bon Appetit magazine named Traverse City one of the Top Five Foodie towns in the nation; and celebrity chef Mario Batali chose the Cooks’ House farm-to-table eatery in T.C. as one of his nine favorite restaurants in the world, alongside the likes of Le Louis XV in Monaco, where lunch prices start at $180.
    “It all has to do with geography,” said Patrick Brys, operations manager of the estate that was a dormant cherry farm when his parents bought it in 1999. It now draws 60,000 to 70,000 visitors a year for wine tastings and sells 8,500 cases a year. Next year, Brys will add an elevated deck to the winery, to provide a better view of Grand Traverse Bay for patrons.
    The sandy soil on the peninsula is perfect for vineyards and the location at the 45th parallel puts Old Mission at the same latitude as famous wine-growing regions Bordeaux in France and Piedmont in Italy.
    Michigan is now the fourth largest grape-growing state after California, Washington and Oregon. Since 2005, wine production in Michigan has grown 65% and 2 million people are expected to visit the state’s wineries this year. Of slightly more than 100 wineries statewide, about 35 are in the Traverse City area.
    Patrick Brys said many visitors come from New York, and are intrigued by not only the wines, but the beauty and affordability of the place. “New Yorkers are sick of the Hamptons,” he said, “and they see that a home on the water here is about $500,000, versus $3 million or $4 million on Long Island.”
    Van Dommelen of the CVB said about 75% of his marketing budget is now spent out-of-state. One ad is a 15-second spot promoting Traverse City, appearing each hour on an electronic billboard in New York’s Times Square.

  • Anonymous

    Northern Michigan becoming foodie, wine-lovers destination – One ad is a 15-second spot promoting Traverse City, appearing each hour on an electronic billboard in New York’s Times Square.
    May 26, 2013 |
    Brys Estate Vineyard & Winery located on the Old Mission Peninsula in Traverse City on Wednesday May 15, 2013. / Ryan Garza/Detroit Free Press

    TRAVERSE CITY Northern Michigan— Now that Pure Michigan advertising has enticed more people to visit the state, it’s up to authentic Michigan experiences — rather than slick promotion or gimmicks — to keep them coming back.
    Otherwise, the notion of Michigan becoming a top-tier tourism draw is merely a vacation from reality.
    Evidence is emerging that the state is indeed building on unique geographic and historic assets, particularly in the Traverse City area, to grow the tourism economic pie. Up-and-coming wine and craft beer industries are meshing with America’s appetite for farm-to-table, locally grown food to turn the region into a “foodie” destination as well as a land of lakes, beauty and outdoor recreation.
    Here’s evidence that these attractions are getting notice outside the state:
    ■ Airlines are adding direct seasonal flights or more seats to Traverse City’s airport from Newark, Cleveland, New York LaGuardia, Denver and Atlanta. “That shows the kind of momentum we’re experiencing and the airlines are recognizing,” said Brad Van Dommelen, president of the Traverse City Convention & Visitors Bureau.
    ■ Traverse City hotels reported a 24% increase in out-of-state visitors last year. Six years ago, only 13.5% of visitors to the region were from outside Michigan; now it’s more than 25%.
    ■ Accolades are coming from afar: Bon Appetit magazine named Traverse City one of the Top Five Foodie towns in the nation; and celebrity chef Mario Batali chose the Cooks’ House farm-to-table eatery in T.C. as one of his nine favorite restaurants in the world, alongside the likes of Le Louis XV in Monaco, where lunch prices start at $180.
    “It all has to do with geography,” said Patrick Brys, operations manager of the estate that was a dormant cherry farm when his parents bought it in 1999. It now draws 60,000 to 70,000 visitors a year for wine tastings and sells 8,500 cases a year. Next year, Brys will add an elevated deck to the winery, to provide a better view of Grand Traverse Bay for patrons.
    The sandy soil on the peninsula is perfect for vineyards and the location at the 45th parallel puts Old Mission at the same latitude as famous wine-growing regions Bordeaux in France and Piedmont in Italy.
    Michigan is now the fourth largest grape-growing state after California, Washington and Oregon. Since 2005, wine production in Michigan has grown 65% and 2 million people are expected to visit the state’s wineries this year. Of slightly more than 100 wineries statewide, about 35 are in the Traverse City area.
    Patrick Brys said many visitors come from New York, and are intrigued by not only the wines, but the beauty and affordability of the place. “New Yorkers are sick of the Hamptons,” he said, “and they see that a home on the water here is about $500,000, versus $3 million or $4 million on Long Island.”
    Van Dommelen of the CVB said about 75% of his marketing budget is now spent out-of-state. One ad is a 15-second spot promoting Traverse City, appearing each hour on an electronic billboard in New York’s Times Square.

  • Anonymous

    Northern Michigan becoming foodie, wine-lovers destination – One ad is a 15-second spot promoting Traverse City, appearing each hour on an electronic billboard in New York’s Times Square.